Musical Underscore Writing—The Stuff That Makes Your Books Sing

Great tips (and example) from the writing duo CD Hersch! From the SoulMate Publishing Authors blog, “Musical Underscore Writing—The Stuff That Makes Your Books Sing”

music underscore photo and music by C.D. Hersh

We went to a concert the other night put on by a local symphonic group. One of the pieces the orchestra played was Dream of a Soldier by Edward Santoro, a WWII army soldier who was a musician and band director. The piece is filled with pathos and emotions—pain, suffering, joy, pride, passion—that Santoro saw reflected in the faces of the soldiers he encountered during the war.

The music reminded us of the underscores one hears in the movies. The crashing sounds of intense, emotional buildup. The rich, melodious strains that support beautiful love scenes. The dissonant, harsh minor chords that underlay pain-laden story events. We heard every emotion played so clearly on the orchestra instruments that it felt like we were being taken on an emotional rollercoaster.

If you’ve ever watched a movie you’ll realize that even though you might not consciously hear…

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1 Comment

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One response to “Musical Underscore Writing—The Stuff That Makes Your Books Sing

  1. Yikes! The LCRW Blog represented this as my blog post, and it is not. I simply reblogged it. Here’s the cover message I tagged on with correct attribution. Our blog shoved it to the end of the post. “Great tips (and example) from the writing duo CD Hersch! From the SoulMate Publishing Authors blog, ‘Musical Underscore Writing—The Stuff That Makes Your Books Sing.'”

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